The Grave of a King's Son in Swinemünde
The former graveyard "Alter Friedhof" of Swinemünde (on the left-hand side opposite the post office) had its own mysteries. Until 1946, there was a mysterious grave at the southern border of the cemetery, with an iron cross about 2 m high. The inscription was:
"Here rest the mortal remains of the Canonicus F.W.Ritz, heir and lord of the manor of Lichtenau and Breitenwerder, born on 31st August 1783, deceased on 31st August 1837. This memorial is dedicated to him by his bereaved family"
What make one suspicious are the letters F and W and the words Ritz and Lichtenau. "F.W." , which is equal to Friedrich Wilhelm, are the initials of four Prussian kings. The title "heir and lord of the manor of Lichtenau and Breitenwerder" and the family name Ritz make it clear that the man laid to rest here was the first illegitimate son of Friedrich Wilhelm II, later to become King of Prussia, and his beloved Wilhelmine Enke. 
 Final resting place of the illegitimate son of the king
The oldest known graveyard in Swinemünde was located in Westswine, a village on the Swina river, directly next to the church, which disappeared a long time ago. As early as at the beginning of the 18th century, this place turned out to be too small and too marshy. In 1771, an area on the former road to Ahlbeck was therefore assigned as a new cemetery for the inhabitants of the emerging town. For more than 150 years, the inhabitants of Swinemünde and sailors were laid to rest there. Whilst the first graves were modest and simple, the later ones took on more and a more splendid and beautiful forms. Richly decorated gravestones of famous families, such as the Krause, Heyse or Scherenberg families, could be admired there. The Jasmund column was also located in the old graveyard. This column was erected on the grave of the seven sailors who were killed in the course of the sea battle near Jasmund in 1864.
The old graveyard also had its mysteries. Until 1946, there was a mysterious grave at the southern border of the cemetery, with an iron cross about 2 m high. The inscription was: „ Here rest the mortal remains of the Canonicus F.W.Ritz, heir and lord of the manor of Lichtenau and Breitenwerder, born on 31st August 1783, deceased on 31st August 1837. This memorial is dedicated to him by his bereaved family"What make one suspicious are the letters F and W and the words Ritz and Lichtenau. "F.W." , which is equal to Friedrich Wilhelm, are the initials of four Prussian kings. The title "heir and lord of the manor of Lichtenau and Breitenwerder" and the family name Ritz make it clear that the man laid to rest here was the first illegitimate son of the Friedrich Wilhelm II, later to become King of Prussia, and his beloved Wilhelmine Enke.
To avoid her being an unmarried "Fräulein" with several illegitimate children, the Hohenzollern family arranged for her to become the (fictitious) wife of the valet Ritz and for the children to take on his name. After his accession in 1776, the king gave her the title "Countess of Lichtenau" and beside the two estates he also gave her half a million talers as a gift. This is the stuff fairytales are made of. However, the countess never became queen.
Obviously, there were too many envious people at that time who grudged her this luck: She had to reimburse the money later. How this was done is not reported in the encyclopaedia of 1869. But it was recorded that there were good-hearted people on the other hand, who provided her with a pension of 4000 talers per year. But even this is not the end of the story: The great Napoleon Bonaparte, who is said to have always been fond of women, ordered that a part of the estates be returned to her .
But what is the reason why the highly honoured canonicus was finally laid to rest in Swinemünde? The reason is very simple, although such things can rarely happen today, with globetrotters flying around the world with an insurance for return transport of their body in case of death.

 He was cruising on board a ship from Stettin. There was a heavy storm in the lagoon, which made him very seasick. After six days in his sickbed in Swinemünde he had still not recovered and on 31st August 1837 he died. This is how Swinemünde, the young town, gained the honour of having an "almost-member of the Hohenzollern family" laid to rest in the cemetery.
After 1945, the Alter Friedhof graveyard was no longer used. Finally, the devastated and destroyed graveyard was converted into a park in 1975. And, of course, the gravestone of F.W. Ritz disappeared without trace.
Dr. J. Pl.